Before You Go: Study Abroad Tips

I have loved every second of my study abroad experience in Spain so far! Even today, when a huge thunderstorm is making going outside pretty unlikely, I’ve gotten to relax, read a little, and go through the (many, many) pictures I’ve taken so far. It also gives me time to take a break and write for you guys! Today I decided to write down a few things that I wish I had known, or thought more about, before I crossed an ocean!

  • Make sure that all the classes you will be taking abroad will transfer back to Northeastern. Even if it it’s a class you might possibly consider taking, you should get it approved by the study abroad office. Nothing would be worse than taking a class here and finding out you won’t get credit for it at NU.
  • Do your research on whatever city you will be living in. You definitely don’t want to be “that American” who has no idea whether your country is a republic or monarchy, or who the king is. You’ll also be able to understand the local culture much better if you have an idea of the history and traditions they have. It’s definitely worth an hour or two on Google so that you know what you’re getting into.
  • If it’s at all possible with your program, stay with a host family. Even though I’ve only lived with them for three weeks, deciding not to live with only other American college students was one of the best decisions I could have made. My Spanish has improved dramatically, and staying with my Spanish family has given me opportunities to see the local culture that I never would have had if I’d stayed in an apartment with other Americans.
  • Pack light! I am the worst at over-packing. The. Worst. But if you’re going off on a semester-long adventure, don’t bring everything you own! You’ll be able to buy most essentials in department stores where you’re going, and no matter how much you tell yourself you won’t go shopping (ahem - me, yesterday) you’ll end up buying things throughout the semester. Get creative with packing so you’re not sweating it out at the airport worrying about whether your bag will make it.
  • Try not to plan everything out. I’m also super guilty of this one. I want to know when, what, and where everything will be happening. But you’ll have a much more enjoyable experience if you let what happens, happen. It’s great to have a list of places to visit, but don’t be afraid to agree to that weekend trip to Portugal that sounds like a lot of fun, even if you hadn’t planned on going. You’ll make great memories in some unexpected places.
  • Write things down. Whether you want to journal, blog, or keep track of your memories some other way, you’ll definitely want to have some way to look back on your experience. I have a friend who made a Twitter specifically for her time abroad - whatever works for you! 
  • I saved one of the most cliched tips for last, which doesn’t mean it’s not true and applicable! Try. New. Things. For example, yesterday I tried bull’s tail (surprisingly good). Studying abroad is an experience full of different and exciting opportunities - take advantage of as many of them as you possible can!

Studying abroad is a fantastic opportunity, and Northeastern has so many incredible programs to fit with anyone’s interests and program requirements. If you end up here, it is at the top of my list of things you should do during your time here! If you have any questions, please feel free to send me a message and let me know. Happy Sunday! 

the-hellagreat-gatsby asked:

Hi! I was a bit confused on the NUwave stuff. I was trying to figure it out, and the website says that its not in all the dorms. Is NUwave like the wifi on campus? and does that mean that there isn't wifi in all the dorms?

Hi! NUwave is our wireless network, yes. As far as I know, and I may be wrong since I didn’t live in a residence hall last year, all residence halls have NUwave in the common rooms, but it’s not guaranteed that you will have wifi in your own individual room. If someone who lived in a res hall last year knows the answer to this, please chime in!

Anonymous asked:

is it common for northeastern students to become friends with or meet students from other schools in the area like boston college, mit, harvard, berklee?

Very! Boston is the quintessential college town, and it’s so easy to meet students from other colleges. My best friend from high school goes to BC, so I have met a lot of friends there through her, but even so, there are plenty of activities and places for college students in Boston where you are able to meet students from other schools!

Anonymous asked:

Hi Sarah! I'm a Malaysian student that is thinking of applying to Northeastern U and I was wondering, why do you love it here? What makes you so happy to be at this university? Also, is it really diverse there? :)

That’s awesome, I’m so happy to hear that you are interested! Oh man, this is hard because I love so many things, but I’ll focus on two. First of all, I love Northeastern because it feels like home. I truly feel as though I belong when I’m on campus, and between my friends, Boston, and all of the support Northeastern offers, I am so comfortable there. Second, I love the flexibility of Northeastern. Rather than try to make you conform to a certain program or expectation, Northeastern encourages you to create your own path, and then they’ll do everything they can to help you achieve that vision. You have the freedom to dream of anything you want, and the support to make that dream a reality. I have yet to have someone tell me that I can’t do something I want to do, but instead explain the possible ways that it could be achieved. Obviously, some things aren’t plausible, but I’ve never felt like I couldn’t come up with a crazy, unlikely idea and see what happens from there. 

I also love more finite things like co-op, living in Boston, the great classes that I’ve taken, the awesome organizations that I belong to, etc. In my experience, it’s very diverse! We have a steadily growing international student population and my roommate freshman year was from China! It’s so easy to meet people from different cultures and backgrounds, which is another thing I love.

Let me know if you have any more questions, and best of luck!

Anonymous asked:

Hi Sarah! I'm not from the East Coast and Boston is a long ways from home but it is still one of my favorite cities. Would you say most people at Northeastern are from the area, or is it fairly diverse? Also, have you done any co-ops and is the co-op process competitive?

Hey there! I’m so glad that you love Boston - I do, too! Out of my 4 roommates, only of us is from Massachusetts. I’m from New Hampshire, so I’m pretty close, but the others are from Long Island, Pennsylvania, and Chicago. I know a ton of people from California, Texas, Seattle, etc. so Northeastern is definitely not just an East Coast school! I have done 2 co-ops so far, and loved both of them. It is a competitive process, because it’s meant to mimic the post-college job search process. You send out your resume, interview, and ultimately are accepted or rejected from a position. I don’t know a single person who got an offer from every single company they applied to. That being said, it’s so helpful in terms of refining your approach to cover letters, interviews, and the job process in general. I have learned so much about what works and what doesn’t! That being said, 99% of students who want to go on co-op receive placements, even if it’s not their first choice. So it is competitive, but it is also supposed to be a learning experience!

Good luck!

samsangel:

Hello fellow nerds!

A new school year is approaching, and since I have to nail my A* this year I put together a masterpost with helpful links and tips that I have gathered throughout my school years. Good luck this year: you´ll do just fine!

1. Learn ´em languages

Learn terms and glossary in Quizlet.
Learn a language for free on Duolingo.
Learn a language for free on Busuu.
Oxford Dictionaries.
Games and fun activities for English learners.
Irregular English verbs.

2. Do your research

Google scholar.
Scholarpedia.
You can learn anything (KhanAcademy).
Didn´t listen in class? (Crash Course).
Simple Wikipedia.
Learn littérature without having to read it (SparkNotes).
Wolfram Aplha.
TED.
Open 2 study. (Online studying) 
Free college courses.

3. Learn how to write like a God

10 practical tips for writing better exam essays.
Writing an essay.
Harvard writing resources.
Writing application essays.
Writing a personal statement.
Genre characteristics.
Writing a literary analysis essay.
Answering essay questions.
Get feedback.
Bibliography maker.
What is the word you´re looking for?

4. Oh yes sweet reading

8 tips to remember what you read.
How to read Shakespeare.
Effective reading and note-taking.
How to take notes while reading.
Note taking tips.
170 free textbooks.
1000 free textbooks.

5. Get your studying and organization game on

Time Management
Get your school life in order with organization.
Reach your goals.
Goals worksheet.
Finding information on the internet.
Using sources.
Get a hold on mind mapping.
How do you learn best?
Sound without music (Such as cafes).
Make flashcards.

6. Stress and anxiety management because school is stressful

Coping strategies.
Stress reduction tips.
Stress relief for students.
Managing test anxiety.
Dealing with test anxiety.
Self help: Keeping calm.
Introverts in college.
Coping and calming down. N.1
Coping and calming down. N.2
Do nothing for two minutes. 

7. Go get ´em tests

Study skills for test taking.
Study tips for finals.
Multiple choice exams guide.
The seven days study plan.
15 steps to success.
How to prepare for a test.
Checklist for essay tests.

8. Classroom participation - because teachers love that shit

Active listening.
Classroom discussions.
Presenting projects in the classroom.
Preparation before class.
Participating tips.

9. Software and pages for us nerdy kids

Openoffice and Libreoffice.
Dropnote.
Google docs.
EverNote.
Prezi (Fore presentations.)
Calculator.
Grade calculator.
Grammar check.
Staying focused for Mac, Chrome and Firefox.
Plagiarism check.
Best apps for students masterpost.
Homework help.

10. Yo! Take some time to care ´bout yo´self

100 000 stars.
Workout masterpost.
Movie masterpost of masterposts.
Self-help masterpost.
8Tracks.
Learn and do yoga.
Voulenteer. 
Learn to play guitar.
The thoughts room.
Disney games because hell yeah.



Happy first day of classes, Northeastern! 

samsangel:

Hello fellow nerds!

A new school year is approaching, and since I have to nail my A* this year I put together a masterpost with helpful links and tips that I have gathered throughout my school years. Good luck this year: you´ll do just fine!

1. Learn ´em languages
2. Do your research
3. Learn how to write like a God
4. Oh yes sweet reading
5. Get your studying and organization game on
6. Stress and anxiety management because school is stressful
7. Go get ´em tests
8. Classroom participation - because teachers love that shit
9. Software and pages for us nerdy kids
10. Yo! Take some time to care ´bout yo´self

Happy first day of classes, Northeastern! 

I’m back! After a long, amazing summer of working in Haiti, I began my new adventure of studying abroad in Seville, Spain for the semester! I’ve been here for about 2 weeks and now that I’m settled in (with wifi! Yay!) I will hopefully be able to keep all of you updated on the amazing things happening here. If you have any questions about studying abroad at Northeastern, or my program specifically, feel free to let me know! Later this week I will post again with more details about my life here. 

I’m back! After a long, amazing summer of working in Haiti, I began my new adventure of studying abroad in Seville, Spain for the semester! I’ve been here for about 2 weeks and now that I’m settled in (with wifi! Yay!) I will hopefully be able to keep all of you updated on the amazing things happening here. If you have any questions about studying abroad at Northeastern, or my program specifically, feel free to let me know! Later this week I will post again with more details about my life here. 

Anonymous asked:

can you please take a picture of your dorm? and maybe just talk about them a bit. like how clean quality of living etc are they super loud bc in the city etc thanks!!

Hi! I actually live in an off-campus apartment, so I don’t think pictures would help you out too much, but if you go to Northeastern’s housing website you’ll find a lot more information about freshmen residence halls!

Each residence hall is different, so it depends on where you end up, but all of them are definitely clean and kept up nicely. The common areas, hallways, and communal bathrooms are cleaned every day, and then it’s up to you how often your clean your own individual room!

As far as loudness, it will probably never be silent like it would be in the suburbs, but I never found loudness to be a problem. I lived on Hemenway Street and Columbus Ave, two of the busier roads around campus, and never had a problem. By October, you probably won’t even notice the sound of cars - it just becomes background noise.

Let me know if there’s anything else I can help you with!

Anonymous asked:

Does Northeastern require you to take SAT Subject tests?

No! You’re more than welcome to submit them if you’ve taken subject tests, but they are not required.